Archive for the 'Podcasts' Category

Podcast #5, featuring Maria Franks

April 5, 2007

For the fifth Canadian PLE podcast (and this week’s third), I have an interview with Maria Franks for you. Maria is the Executive Director of the Legal Information Society of Nova Scotia (LISNS).

What’s in this one? Maria’s thoughts and tips on:

  • what you name your public legal education organization,
  • how you raise funds for it,
  • and what PLEAC needs to do to ensure a strong future for PLE.

The podcast is available as an mp3, which you can download by clicking here [38 MB MP3]. Let me know, in the comments below, what you think.

Advertisements

Podcast #4, featuring Peter Ringrose

April 3, 2007

Another podcast today, this time spotlighting the work and thoughts of Peter Ringrose. Peter has a long history with public legal education in Canada. Decades ago, he worked on early PLE efforts in New Brunswick, where he practiced and taught law. In 1984, he became the first executive director of the brand new Public Legal Information Association of Newfoundland (PLIAN), which he led for ten years. Peter is now the executive director of the Law Society of NL.

In my half-hour chat with Peter, we talked a lot about some of his most experimental PLE projects—including the PLE novel, Ask Me No Questions—and tackled some controversial areas, like:

  • whether pamphlets are worth it,
  • whether it’s possible to reach communities in the North,
  • and whether, as one Canadian MP once said, PLE today is out of big ideas and “just running printing presses” anymore.

The podcast is available as an mp3, which you can download by clicking here [38 MB MP3]. As always, I welcome all of your comments.

Podcast #3, featuring Ann Sherman

April 2, 2007

At long last, I’ve had a chance to edit some of the recorded interviews I have on hand. Over the first part of this week, I’ll be releasing three(!!!) new podcasts.

Today, half an hour with Ann Sherman, the just-retired former executive director of the Community Legal Information Association of PEI. Ann talks thoughtfully with me about PLE in Canada’s smallest province, focusing on special topics like:

  • the community development piece of PLE,
  • reaching low literacy groups,
  • and the need for more research in PLE.

The podcast is available as an mp3, which you can download by clicking here [42 MB MP3]. If you have any trouble with the file, or any comments on the content, leave a comment here.

Podcast #2, featuring Carol McEown and Lois Gander

December 18, 2006

For the second in my series of podcasts on Canadian public legal education, I have an interview with two well-known and long-time PLE practitioners: Carol McEown, recently retired manager of public legal education services at the Legal Services Society of BC, and Lois Gander, Director of the Legal Studies Program at the University of Alberta. This turned out to be a sweeping, forty-minute discussion about the evolution of PLE in Canada, its radical origins and empowering possibilities, and a host of other topics. Here are two quotes to give a taste:

I absolutely grew up believing that the law belonged to me … to use and to challenge and to make work for my community. —Carol McEown

We have gone away from the idea that the public are citizens and have any ownership of the law or the processes … I think we’ve got to get away from the “consumer” mentality. —Lois Gander

The podcast is available as an mp3, which you can download by clicking here. If you have any trouble with the file, or any comments on the content, let me know by clicking on the “Comments” link, below.

Audio from the field: Podcast #1, featuring Gordon Hardy

December 6, 2006

podcast.gifOne of the artifacts I picked up from my November site visits in Vancouver was a “for air” interview with Gordon Hardy, Executive Director of the People’s Law School. Rather than try to describe it, I hope you’ll listen to it. It is the first “podcast” in a series that I hope to present through this blog.

It is an mp3 file, and you can download it by clicking here. It runs a little over twenty minutes. Let me know by email if you have any trouble opening or hearing the file.